The goal is to live a full, productive life even with all that ambiguity. No matter what happens, whether the cancer never flares up again or whether you die, the important thing is that the days that you have had you will have lived.
— Gilda Radner

Cancer and chronic illnesses often prompt a lot of social, scheduling, financial, physical, and emotional struggle. In a body-centric culture like ours, having your body become an obstacle and a source of disease, pain, and grief can be exceedingly difficult to navigate without support. 

cancer patients and survivors

Cancer can take away all of my physical abilities. It cannot touch my mind, it cannot touch my heart, and it cannot touch my soul.
— Jim Valvano

 

A cancer diagnosis can bring up a plethora of emotional responses. It may be a relief to have an explanation for your symptoms. It may be terrifying, overwhelming, and disorienting. It may cycle you through all of the stages of grief. It may prompt a strong internal sense to fight and be strong. It may swing between more than one set of emotions. Regardless of your emotional and psychological response, it is common to experience a sense of invasion or betrayal by your body. It can be traumatic. 

Therapy, especially nature-based therapy, has been shown to have positive results regarding pain levels, sense of well-being, recovery times, and mental clarity. If nature-based interventions do not suit you, other options include:

  • EMDR therapy
  • mindfulness-based therapy
  • art therapy
  • equine therapy
  • Cancer as a Rite of Passage

cancer caregivers

When someone has cancer, the whole family and everyone who loves them does, too.
— Terri Clark

As a spouse/partner, friend, sibling, parent, or child of someone diagnosed with cancer, you are also impacted. Unfortunately, there are not as many support groups and resources for you as for your loved one. Still, you also feel the immensity of the change in schedule, finances, health. Your sense of instability and uncertainty may be at an all-time high. You are undoubtedly exerting a lot of energy in order to navigate this reality. 

Perhaps you want to come in for couples' or family counseling as you navigate this challenge. Perhaps you need a place of your own to voice and process your emotions, concerns, and struggles. Join me. Together, therapy can give you resources to better take care of yourself and your loved one. 

chronic illness patients and survivors

Sometimes monsters are invisible, and
sometimes demons attack you from the inside.
Just because you cannot see the claws and the teeth
does not mean they aren’t ripping through me.
Pain does not need to be seen to be felt.
— Emm Roy

 

A chronic illness can prompt a variety of emotional responses. It may be a relief to have an explanation for your symptoms. It may be terrifying, overwhelming, and disorienting. It may cycle you through all of the stages of grief. It may prompt a strong internal sense to fight and be strong. It may swing between more than one set of emotions. Regardless of your emotional and psychological response, it is common to experience a sense of invasion or betrayal by your body. It can be traumatic. 

Therapy, especially nature-based therapy, has been shown to have positive results regarding pain levels, sense of well-being, recovery times, and mental clarity. If nature-based interventions do not suit you, other options include:

  • EMDR therapy
  • mindfulness-based therapy
  • art therapy
  • equine therapy
  • Illness as a Rite of Passage

chronic illness caregivers 

All parents set out with expectations, hopes and dreams for their child. When a child is diagnosed with a health problem, these aspirations are altered. While one parent is hoping to see their child graduate from university, another is praying that they can live pain free.
— Sharon Dempsey

As a spouse/partner, friend, sibling, parent, or child of someone with a chronic illness, you are also impacted. Unfortunately, there are not as many support groups and resources for you as for your loved one. Still, you also feel the immensity of the change in schedule, finances, health. Your sense of instability and uncertainty may be at an all-time high. You are undoubtedly exerting a lot of energy in order to navigate this reality. 

Perhaps you want to come in for couples' or family counseling as you navigate this challenge. Perhaps you need a place of your own to voice and process your emotions, concerns, and struggles. Join me. Together, therapy can give you resources to better take care of yourself and your loved one.